"Self-sufficiency does not mean 'going back' to the acceptance of a lower standard of living. On the contrary, it is the striving for a higher standard of living, for food that is organically grown and good, for the good life in pleasant surroundings... and for the satisfaction that comes from doing difficult and intricate jobs well and successfully." John Seymour ~ Self Sufficiency 2003

Wednesday, 25 March 2015

Yin and yang of gardening


Strange as it may seem, both of these pineapple sage plants, positioned at the entrance to our shadecloth veggie tunnel, were potted at the same time, using exactly the same soil mixture.  And both receive water on exactly the same day / at the same time.
One pineapple sage bush is in bloom, the other
plant - nada
As you can see, the one on the right is in full bloom, whilst the one on the left shows nary a sign.
Pineapple sage flowers
The flowers are exquisite, and, given their tubular design, attract the sunbirds with their long beaks.  The flowers themselves do not appear to have a scent, but the leaves - on being gently crushed - exude a distinct smell of pineapple :)

kymber - there may be a very small parcel arriving - shortly...

14 comments:

  1. oh Dani - that plant is beautiful! i am sure that the hummingbirds around here would go crazy for those flowers! it's weird that one plant flourished and the other one did not. but i would love some seeds! what can i send you in return??? name it - i'll send anything!!!

    (how about one of my big fat lazy cats who are eating me out of house and home? naw, probably not a good idea. it would cost an ungodly amount to ship one of those cats!!!!)

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    1. woops - in my haste to get a comment to you i forgot to say - much love to you and yours!

      your friend,
      kymber

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    2. kymber - Not sure about seeds as the plant tends to send out underground "babies", but perhaps some "tea leaves"... ;)

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    3. rats! i have been thinking about those beautiful flowers all morning. oh well, beggars can't be choosers and i'll take whatever you have to offer! but now i am on the hunt for pineapple sage seeds...i'll let you know what i find!

      what would you like in return? i have all kinds of crazy seeds here....

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    4. kymber - Just be patient... ;)

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  2. I notice that with seedlings. All sown from the same packet, same soil, same lighting, same watering. Some are HUGE, some spindly and weak. I've often wondered what was going on. Ah well, the mysteries of nature......

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    1. Sue - Guess that applies to mankind as well - often family members show the same idiosyncrasies that are evident in the above plants. Genes are the key lol

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    2. Yes! You are right.
      I am NOTHING like my brother.
      Same parents.....but worlds apart............in EVERYTHING.
      LOL!

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  3. It happens here too. Yesterday I planted several flats of transplants we started from seed. All planted at the same time, in the same medium, and given the same care. But while most were more or less the same size, a few were whoppers and a few were runts. I suppose plants have individual traits too. :)

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    1. Bill - I've had that happen too. I always put it down to that particular seed not being 100% fertilized by the bee lol

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  4. Before we got goats and chickens, my wife had this place looking like the Garden of Eden. There were flowers and vines everywhere, and one of her chief pleasures was going to the nursery at the Farmers Depot to get new plants. We would sometimes get the same plant, from the same row at the nursery, plant them in the same place, and the phenomenon you posted about would occur. For no discernible reason, one would grow much better than the other. I never could figure out why.

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    1. Harry - Regarding chickens - why not try keeping them in a chicken tractor? That way you can monitor where they can do damage. Goats - ditto.

      Or - if the above is too much work, then perhaps your best option is to enclose your (hopefully) new veggie patch. You live in a forest / wood - you could use fallen branches to enclose the veggie patch. So - all it should cost you is a few screws / nails.

      We've just done that - I'll be posting about it shortly.

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  5. That is so strange that one would flower & the other one. I can't wait to get some flowering plants in the ground!

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Thank you for taking the time to comment - it makes my day and removes the "loneliness' of sitting at my screen blogging supposedly to myself ;)