"Self-sufficiency does not mean 'going back' to the acceptance of a lower standard of living. On the contrary, it is the striving for a higher standard of living, for food that is organically grown and good, for the good life in pleasant surroundings... and for the satisfaction that comes from doing difficult and intricate jobs well and successfully." John Seymour ~ Self Sufficiency 2003

Saturday, 27 December 2014

In the heat of the moment

I know from Sky News that those in the UK were spared a White Christmas. Personally, I'd love to be subjected to a White Christmas, but that is my British roots shouting at me...

I mean, seriously, how many people would like to cook their Christmas dinner in temperatures like this:
Clicking on the
image will reveal
a temperature of
31oC at 2.20p.m.
on Christmas Eve
- in the shade
I definitely cannot light up the Rosie in that kind of heat - the additional heat it would produce indoors would be suicidal!  So, we use our outside barbeque as an oven - and leave the heat outside where it belongs.  This works well and normally, within 2 - 3 hours, our turkey is perfectly cooked.  However, Christmas pudding is 100% out of the question.  Far to "starchy" for our temperature.  If we could celebrate Christmas in winter, when one needs the additional starch intake in order to create warmth within the body, then it would definitely be on the menu.  I have wonderful childhood memories of helping to boil 6d's (and even a tickey in the early years immediately after immigrating to this country) and hiding them within the pud, prior to cooking it.  I wonder if that still happens overseas?

But, strangely enough, Mike, our grandson who spent the weekend prior to Christmas with us, commented that "Christmas isn't Christmas without snow".  Seems as though the concept of a cold, white, snow-bedecked Christmas, either originating from the traditional Christmas images reproduced on Christmas cards, or his grandmother's roots, are rearing their head within him, and leaving him feeling a yearning for a White Christmas - just like his Nana :)

16 comments:

  1. I agree--it wouldn't seem like Christmas to me without snow. We barely had a covering this year--it's rained and rained and it sure is dismal....but there's that teensy bit of snow hanging on so I'm ok.
    Google Christmas scenes and you'll see---everything points to a snowy Christmas.
    Happy Holidays, Dani

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    Replies
    1. Sue - Exactly - snow = Christmas :)

      Happy days to you too, Sue :)

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  2. No snow on Christmas Day But quite a lot fell yesterday (boxing day)
    The chickens aren't too keen on the snow and some visiting has has to be put off because of the roads, but the fire is burning brightly and we have lots of Christmas goodies still to eat. I am also sitting here with my knees covered in a quilt made for me by my granddaughter as a Christmas present (Bragging - but how good is that?!)
    Gillx

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    1. Gill - Oh, I can just picture the scene you describe... How wonderful that your granddaughter is so creative - it's a rare thing with today's young'uns.

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  3. We never (well, rarely) get snow and our temps vary wildly. Some Christmases it's 80F and some it's freezing. That definitely makes it a hit or miss. ;-)

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    1. 1st Man - Sounds like you sometimes have the same temps as us - too bloody hot for Christmas ;)

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  4. Dani, please tell me what 6d's and a tickey are. I've never heard those terms.

    Thanks,

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    Replies
    1. Marlin - 6d is sixpence (UK coin) and a tickey was 2 1/2 South African cents. I know the tickey is no longer in production (it stopped being minted in the early 1960's) but I'm not sure if the sixpence is still around.

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    2. Sixpence went out with decimalisation. (1970s) The smallest silver coin now is a 5 pence piece, but of course no one puts such things in puddings now because they are considered a choking hazard. Shame!!!

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    3. Thanks FiD. Yeah - memories not being made just so the unobservant can be safe. Great pity... (Surely parents would / could / should "search" the pudding of little 'uns, before they give them the bowl?)

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  5. Dani, you and my Australian friends celebrating Christmas in the heat seems strange, even though I understand the reason for it. I saw a news clip with Australians swimming at the beach, wearing Santa hats!

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    1. Harry - Trust me - it is strange LOL

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  6. We had a cool clear Christmas night this year. Not always in our neck of the woods. For instance, today was close to 80. January is usually our cold month.

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    1. Dallas - It's weird, isn't it! Personally, I prefer a COLD Christmas ;)

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  7. Even though I live in the northern hemisphere, we've had less white Christmases than snowy ones. When I lived in Houston Christmas could be downright hot! I have to say I really like a cold Christmas too. Just seems to make the season. :)

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    1. Leigh - It does indeed. Hot, dry, water-starved plants, trees and crunchy grass does not an ideal Chirstmas make LOL

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