"Self-sufficiency does not mean 'going back' to the acceptance of a lower standard of living. On the contrary, it is the striving for a higher standard of living, for food that is organically grown and good, for the good life in pleasant surroundings... and for the satisfaction that comes from doing difficult and intricate jobs well and successfully." John Seymour ~ Self Sufficiency 2003

Wednesday, 27 February 2013

What a Whopper!

I obviously boasted too much last year about my tomatoes in the shadecloth veggie patch, and so this year I've been brought back to earth.  The mice, and whitefly, put paid to my tomato harvest this year with a resultant pretty poor harvest.  But there have been other rewards.
I tried to warn you with this pic...
Earlier this month I showed you a pic of an onion I had growing in my shadecloth veggie patch.  Well, the time came to harvest it.
I have never seen a 2.6kg onion before!
I was surprised - I thought my re-occurring tennis elbow (and I've never played tennis in my life) would prevent my "plucking" it from it's obviously beloved home in the earth, but it came out surprisingly easily.

Now, my greatest problem is going to be using all of it before the balance of it dries out / rots in my fridge.  Unfortunately, onion soup is not an option - it creates too much gas... LOL
Tyres in the background...
Then, you recall that RMan scored some used tyres when he went to auction a while back.  I had them ear marked for potatoes, so as soon as I had some which were sprouting, I shoved them in the tyres, covered them with soil, and made sure they got enough water - they were not on the irrigation system.  The flowers had all died, and on Monday this week I also harvested them.

This is what I uncovered...
Not the greatest harvest, but I'm chuffed none
the less :)  RMan couldn't believe it LOL
Bearing in mind that they were potatoes which were sprouting, and some of them were not "nice" - I reckon that's not a bad reward for a first effort.  Any potato growing tips will be greatly appreciated.

At least I'm getting to know now what does, and does not, grow here...  And how vital crop rotation is for controlling "undesirables"...

12 comments:

  1. That's one heck of an onion! If it's too much for quick use, why not chop and dehydrate in your sun box? Dried onion bits are really nice in soups, stews, casseroles, etc. They store well and last till next season.

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    1. Kris - Clever girl LOL I have such a relationship with onions that I don't always think clearly. Very good idea :)

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  2. Your harvest pictures are very encouraging. Our onion starts are only an inch tall right now. We look forward to posting something like what we see in your pics tonight.

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    1. Jody - Patience, your time is coming... :)

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  3. What a 'whopper' ! Got me thinking about a nice roast onion tart.....mmmm

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    1. Emma - welcome, and thank you for taking the time to leave a comment :)

      Now, you know, I've never thought about, never mind eaten, a roast onion tart...!

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  4. I agree with Kris about chopping and dehydrating - I use dehydrated onions quite often. Also, chopped and frozen onions (quick-frozen on cookie sheets to keep them from clumping together, then double-bagged or put in jars for odor-free storage in the freezer). I wonder how long that massive onion will last you?

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    1. Quinn - Do dehydrated onions cause as much "gas"? LOL

      Unfortunately, my freezer is switched off, as we don't have the spare solar power / battery storage to run it as well as our fridge 24 / 7 / 365. I miss it terribly, and therefore my only option with excess harvest is to dehydrate or can. I've tried dehydrating swiss chard, but with no luck so far...

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  5. wow! that is some onion! let us know how it tastes! i am with emma. my wife makes pissaladière, this french onion and anchovy tart. soooo good!

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    1. SPrig - Thanks - will check out the recipe :)

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  6. What a beautiful onion. Mine are always small !

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    1. JAne - I've NEVER grown one that size before either. In fact, all my onions in the past have been a failure...! Go figure.

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