"Self-sufficiency does not mean 'going back' to the acceptance of a lower standard of living. On the contrary, it is the striving for a higher standard of living, for food that is organically grown and good, for the good life in pleasant surroundings... and for the satisfaction that comes from doing difficult and intricate jobs well and successfully." John Seymour ~ Self Sufficiency 2003

Sunday, 18 January 2015

1000kgs


As you all know from this post the ph balance of our soil is incorrect and lime is required to correct it if we want to grow oats with which to feed our alpacas.

We had previously purchased lime in 40kg bags, but that is the expensive way of doing it.

The storeman at our co-op suggested we purchase 500kgs bags.

That's more like it.

But, he couldn't source 500kg bags, so the next best was 1000 kgs.

Now, that is all well and good - they can load it onto the delivery truck with the proper equipment - but offloading it is another matter.

My boer (farmer) husband made a plan.
Even with the assistance of the driver and
his companion, 1000kgs is too heav
y for
RMan.  Tine to haul out the tractor...
Driving his tractor to where the truck was parked, one end of a strong rope was connected to the bag and the other to the tractor.  Slowly, slowing inching the tractor forwards resulted in the bag being carefully dragged off the truck bed...
With the help of the right equipment, the
1000kg of lime had no other option than
to slide off the truck bed and onto the field.
... and onto the ground.

Now, it's just a case of sprinkling the lime everywhere and working it into the soil... :)

14 comments:

  1. Where there's a will, there's a way. I have trouble enough lifting 50 pound sacks of chicken feed. Shifting lime sounds pretty hard.

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    Replies
    1. Harry - I don't know what we would have done without the tractor. Bulk farming supplies are cheaper to purchase, but the very bulk of them presents huge problems. And without a block and tackle, or a small front end loader or forklift, the tractor was the only means by which we could shift the 2 X 1000kg bags of lime off the truck.

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  2. There's an awful lot in a 1000kg pile. Good luck with the sprinkling.
    xx

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  3. The thought of having such a big bag of lime kind of boggles the mind. My poor back is still sore after loading those 20 Kg bags into customers cars years ago. I can't imagine a bag that big....

    But with the Fir trees we have here, I sure could use some. Looking forward to reading about your adventure.

    Jen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jen - These were certainly bags which couldn't be picked up lol

      Yeah - we hope it helps. But have been warned that we may need to apply it again next year, and then finally the year after too.

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  4. We have the issue with purchasing feed for our chickens and pigs. The least expensive way (and sometimes the only way) for us to buy soy-free, GMO-free feed is to drive about 2 hours (one way) and load our pickup truck with as much as we can and carefully make our way home, after having hopefully planned to to it on a day it doesn't rain. We tried to find the maximum load weight for our in the manual but it made no sense as all. We've also had to devise various ways of loading/unloading a wide variety of things. Farming does make you creative.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cherie - We had to ensure there was no rain forecast too. Wouldn;t that have been something. Off-loading the lime and then the rain coming down...!

      Yup, farming certainly stimulates the brain cells lol

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  5. They are very lucky alpacas indeed !

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    Replies
    1. Jane - They are indeed, but they are very appreciative alpcas too :)

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  6. If we buy in large quantities like that our local feed store will come out and spread it (they have a truck that does it). Thankfully.

    Your use of the word "boer" sent me off to Google. We raise Boer goats and I've heard of the Boer War, but I didn't know the word means farmer. I'm glad to have learned that! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill - Boer goats are very popular here too.

      Wow - you're very lucky that your feed store performs that service for you!

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  7. There's me wondering how I'm going to get a bag of compost out of my car! Good job :)

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    Replies
    1. Chickpea - Maybe you should use another car (in place of the tractor) and a length of rope LOL

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