"Self-sufficiency does not mean 'going back' to the acceptance of a lower standard of living. On the contrary, it is the striving for a higher standard of living, for food that is organically grown and good, for the good life in pleasant surroundings... and for the satisfaction that comes from doing difficult and intricate jobs well and successfully." John Seymour ~ Self Sufficiency 2003

Saturday, 5 April 2014

Scorpion identification


We have seen a few scorpions inside our farmhouse since we moved here.

But, with our grandson Mike striding round bare foot most of the time (even though we have told him to always wear shoes of some sort), and with granddaughter Baby HJG's future crawling / toddling in mind, I decided to acquaint myself with what scorpions were life threatening, and which weren't.
Quick reference scorpion picture
This simple photo that I found was such an informative picture I thought that it would be helpful to someone else if I shared it.  That way they can save it to their desktop, then print it out, and place it where it will always be a quick source of reference.

Thankfully, the scorpions we have seen all have a thin to medium tail - so, at worst a bee sting type pain, and an irritation.  And not life threatening...

Forewarned is forearmed :)

12 comments:

  1. I'm happy we don't have to worry about scorpions and other dangerous beasties here. That picture looks very useful to have around and check quickly.

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    1. dreamer - There is a yellow tailed scorpion in England. It would appear to be non-poisonous though :)

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  2. Though we don't have scorpions here,...they are where my grandson is. Good reference-thanks for posting!
    :)

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  3. We have little brown scorpions here, about the size of a roach. If they sting you, it hurts like hades but they can't kill you. If you take off your shirt here while you are working outside, it's a really bad idea to put it back on without shaking it thoroughly. You never know when one of those things will crawl up into it.

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    1. Harry - I haven't see a thick tailed scorpion thank goodness, but, we make sure to shake anything before putting it on - shoes, slippers, clothing, blankets... ;)

      Better safe than sorry...

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  4. Isn't it lucky that the highly venomous one has such a distinctive feature that can be seen from a distance! Good idea to share this info, Dani :)

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    1. Quinn - I'm not sure if this is a standard venomous identification for scorpions world-wide, but a quick Google for your respective areas / states will soon clarify that. Hopefully, it is that simple...

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  5. bleck. but thanks for sharing. i am a Scorpio but thank goodness we don't have to worry about scorpions around here. bleck.

    your friend,
    kymber

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    1. kymber - Check out: http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/en/article/scorpion/ ;)

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    2. i checked it Dani - the only scorpions we have are waaaaaaaay out west in the prairies and BC.....that's like 5,000miles away from us. no scorpions here, thank goodness. i can handle spiders and mice and voles and stuff but i just know i couldn't handle seeing a real-live scorpion!

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    3. LOL - they're not that prolific, and quite easy / distinctive to spot...

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