"Self-sufficiency does not mean 'going back' to the acceptance of a lower standard of living. On the contrary, it is the striving for a higher standard of living, for food that is organically grown and good, for the good life in pleasant surroundings... and for the satisfaction that comes from doing difficult and intricate jobs well and successfully." John Seymour ~ Self Sufficiency 2003

Saturday, 3 September 2016

Finally - culinary success

Kymber is forever posting about fermented veggies and kimchi.

And, although I have tried making sauerkraut a number of times, it has alway managed to "achieve an aroma" which put me off, and has caused RMan to throw it away.

I have finally succeeded this winter though.  And I now know why my previous attempts have been a failure.
Fermented cabbage - success at last!
In tryng to make sauerkraut in summer, the ambient room temperature has been too hot.
Home made salad dressing to splash on the
(95% home grown) salad
(our avo trees are still to young to produce),
and homemade fermented cabbage -
easy summer veggies to serve at the drop
 of a hat :)
It was the winter 2016 issue of the go! Platteland magazine that spurred me on to try again this year - with these two recipes.
Fermented cabbage & kimchi recipe
(Recipe courtesy of go! Platteland Winter 2016 issue)
So, with the success of my first trial batch, I got clever.  Not only have I got fermented white cabbage, but I have got fermented red cabbage too ;)  Success, of course, made me giddy - and I know have 6 jars of white and red sauerkraut in the fridge.  Loving ginger as I do, I added about 2.5 cms of peeled, chopped ginger to two of the sauerkraut jars.  I haven't tasted those yet though...

BUT, even if you're an avid fermented cabbage fan, please, make yourself a batch of their sweet and sour pickled cabbage.  It is just too devine :D
Sweet & Sour pickled cabbage recipe
(Recipe courtesy of go! Platteland Winter 2016 issue)
I added some of my preserved piquante peppers to
 this as well as the chillies - yummy...
I am completely hooked on it - and would even eat it with boiled eggs if I could ;)

Very cool!!

I will try and see if I can grow cabbage in my shadelcoth veggie patch this summer and, if I am successful, from now on before I make any cabbage for RMan and I, and before the chickens demolish the outer leaves and the alpaca's wolf down their share of thinly sliced cabbage, I am definitely making more pickled cabbage this summer.  Saukerkraut and kimchi - when my fridge stock is finished I will just have to wait until next winter when the temperature is once again suitable for fermenting vegetables... 


P.S.  Don't fret if you can't find the Winter 2016 issue in the store anymore - go! Platteland have additional copies which can be back ordered

14 comments:

  1. I love it with fried rice and a fried egg. When I used to eat sausages I would have it with that as well. looks good! yum

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    1. Sol - Oooooh, I haven't tried it with that... ;)

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    2. Thank You Dani, This pickled Veggie was absolutely delicious, we enjoyed it with our meat dishes, & even as a side salad. Well Done xx U are so creative, also just love your pickled egg recipe.

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    3. Gloria - You're very welcome my friend. So glad you enjoyed it :D

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  2. That looks scrumptious. My attempts in the city to ferment chilli sauce were a total flop, but I suspect if it's homegrown, it'll co-operate nicely. Who knows what they do to those supermarket veggies.

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    Replies
    1. pqsa - Hmmm, it's good you mention that. Did you know that veggies like cauliflower are sprayed with something - to keep them "white" whilst they sit in the display fridges? The spray is water soluable, which is why they should always be thoroughly washed before use...

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  3. Always nice to learn new skills! I've heard "homemade" is SOOOOO much better!

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    Replies
    1. Sue - Definitely mmmmmmmmuch better :D

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  4. Dani, being a fermented food lover I'm very pleased for you and your success! I know exactly what you mean about the summer heat, however. It's a real problem for me too, not only for sauerkraut and the like, but also kefir and sourdough. It's just too hot. I haven't figured out what to do and one of the things Dan and I discuss is whether we could really live with out the refrigerators and freezer, or how to get at least those items off grid.

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    Replies
    1. Leigh - I'd love to be able to keep things cold / frozen without having to use a fridge / freezer. Sadly, it is just too hot here for that - not even an underground one.

      I have seen LP gas fridges and freezers, but don't know how expensive they are to purchase, nor run... Would that I had someone in the fmaily, who lived nearby, and who could bring me dry ice the way that Jane from Hardwork Homestead use to get from her husband's business ;)

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  5. Dani,may I interject a thought here.My late father in law told me about a coolroom that they had.It had a zinc roof and "walls" that had coal in.Water trickled or dripped on the roof, not sure if it ran down the walls.They would keep the meat that they cooked and covered with fat in this cool house

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    Replies
    1. Sharon - I have heard of charcoal fridges, but doubt that in the heat of summer, they would work sufficently in order allow me to make sauerkraut without my having to use a fair amount of water to keep the interior cool enough? If we has a stream or brook running through our property I would certainly give it a go :)

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  6. I've also found summers too hot to do fermented food. Also had better results in Winter. In Kwazulu-Natal temps are often 36-38 easy

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    Replies
    1. Sharon - I have made enough to last until next winter - I hope lol Otherwise I'll just have to eat pickled carrots and cabbage until it is cooler agaih :D

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