"Self-sufficiency does not mean 'going back' to the acceptance of a lower standard of living. On the contrary, it is the striving for a higher standard of living, for food that is organically grown and good, for the good life in pleasant surroundings... and for the satisfaction that comes from doing difficult and intricate jobs well and successfully." John Seymour ~ Self Sufficiency 2003

Saturday, 24 May 2014

Harvesting the water from mist

Short and sweet today...
Image source
I'd love one of these in my garden :)
You can see how the netting captures the
moisture from the mist
But, there again, wandering out in the garden early one day last week when it was almost completely misted in...
T'was a brilliantly icy, misty early morning...
... and, then toddling through the shadecloth veggie patch I spied... 
Here you can see the mist droplets collecting
on all the spiderwebs on the walls of the
shadecloth veggie patch
... mist collecting on the shadecloth (and spiderwebs) around my veggie hut...
Visible proof that the mist is accumulating
on the net of the shadecloth veggie hut
...and dripping from the roof of the veggie hut.

Which proves the principle completely :)

But I fancy the look of the structure - very Out of Africa :)

16 comments:

  1. I love it when I can learn something new! I would never have thought about collecting morning mist. Something similar might be applicable here, for where I live along side the river, early foggy mornings are frequent. Thanks for showing the possibilities.

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    1. Vicki - The beauty of sharing this is that if ever you find yourself in a situation where you have no water to drink, but there is dew / mist / condensation during the day / night, you will be able to harvest pure water to drink.

      For those who live in (hectic) drought area, this is a valuable source of water :)

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  2. That is SO cool. You know when I first saw the top picture, I imagined it as something from the future, like a movie where they are showing future solutions to problems. I guess the future is now!

    It has a natural, organic beauty to it as well doesn't it? Almost like something designed by nature herself. What an interesting solution.

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    Replies
    1. 1st Man - It is attractive, isn't it - and, yes, it is almost someting designed by nature :)

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  3. In one of the No.1 Ladies Detective Agency books I was struck by a description of how Mr. JLB Matakone would carefully create a system with a line of string that would feed condensed dewdrops to each plant in his garden. So simple, so brilliant.

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  4. And just for contrast, at this moment I am in the goat barn, spending the afternoon keeping an eye on my older doe who is due to kid this weekend. It is 53F/12C, but so damp I feel chilled to the bone - and brought out a blanket to wrap up in!

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    Replies
    1. Quinn - LOL 12oC - I would definitely need a blanket to keep me warm(er). 13oC is your summer????

      The system you describe in your first comment sounds like a basic drip irrigation - did the author give any more info?

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    2. Quinn - Btw, forgot to ask - any progress on the kid? Do you have to assist goats with their birthing?

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  5. Dani - that is beautiful! and such a good idea for places that regularly experience drought conditions. we have a ton of mist and early morning fog here....if we ever needed to, we could collect the mist and dew. and if you live in a very rural area where there isn't alot of pollution, the mist/dew that you collected would be beautiful drinking water. thanks for sharing. i hope that you get one of those...or better yet...your MAN comes up with an idea on how to make one. i know that he can. and now he hates me for adding another thing to his "honey-do" list - bahahahahahah!

    much love Dani! your friend,
    kymber

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    Replies
    1. kymber - "Honey-do" list comes waaaaaay after his list...

      Yeah - pollution free mist water would be ideal, but in a push, even water from polluted mist would be better than dying of thirst LOL

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  6. I like that. I hope I never need to build one, because it would mean we were in an awful drought, but I like the idea and the look. It does look "out of Africa."

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    Replies
    1. Harry - Here's hoping we all never get to this state, but a good idea to be prepared and have alternative options available.

      "Out of Africa" in Africa LOL

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  7. was talking to someone about this, and he pointed out - if I can see dew on my Pelargonium tometosum leaves ... then there is dew available to harvest.

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    Replies
    1. Diana - Exactly, and for those in rural areas that have no access to running water, this is an excellent way for them to obtain some clean drinking water :)

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Thank you for taking the time to comment - it makes my day and removes the "loneliness' of sitting at my screen blogging supposedly to myself ;)