Monday, 23 April 2012

Bits and pieces

Boring I know, but I also managed to harvest yet more swiss chard over the Easter Weekend.  Wow, I now have so much parceled up in the freezer - we certainly won't be running out this winter.  Spinach soup, spanokopita (hopefully cooked in the Dover stove) spinach omelettes, creamed spinach - yummy, another firm favourite vegetable that even RMan will eat.
Yet more swiss chard ready for harvesting
I had previously harvested the only pumpkin off a withered stalk and I was delighted to find another one - growing on the last plant I left in situ "just in case".  I'm not sure if it's going to gain much bulk as I fear it is too late in the season - I'll have to wait and see.
A baby pumpkin lay hidden - waiting to surprise
and delight me :)
You recall we left our potted Christmas tree behind in our town garden, and that we had to purchase a pomegranate tree from a local nursery in order to use it as a Christmas tree.
The pomegranate tree we used as a
Christmas tree
Well, before we left the farm in January we planted them, ensuring that they were watered via the timed irrigation hose.  One of the trees had had three small pomegranates hanging from some branches.  At Easter they were ripe, so we picked one.
Our first pomegranate fruit
To give you a sense of proportion, the fruit we picked was the size of two of my hands loosely cupped together (roughly 8 - 10cms diameter).  We cracked it open and delved into it's deliciousness.
All those arils (seeds)with their delicious juice are
carefully stored in different protective
compartments within the fruit
Pomegranates are delicious in a salad (a green or fruit salad), added as a garnish to meals, as an ice cream topping or squeezed for their juice.  Pomegranate juice can also be made into a syrup and used as a cordial, or added to sauces / gravies.  Dried pomegranate arils (seeds) can be used in granola bars.


A single pomegranate with a 10cm (4") diameter (weighing approx. 280 gms) has a high anti-oxidant content and is also high in Vitamin C and Vitamin K - the latter being essential for the proper absorption of calcium - obtained either from your diet or when taken as a supplement.
The fruit from one pomegranate - we shared it
between us :)
The other two fruits were too ripe and had cracked open.  So I scooped out the seed, rinsed and dried them off and set them aside.  I will and try and grow a couple more pomegranate trees next spring :)


RMan and I are very encouraged to finally be reaping some "fruits of our labour".  I have so many ideas of what I want to do, especially with the lemons and pomegranates - I can hardly wait for them to produce more fruit...




By the way, I am unable to post in the new Blogger GUI - I finally thought of, and have changed back to the old Blogger GUI to post this.  I have reported it, but, if the Old Blogger should fail, then I fear you are going to have silence from me until the problem is resolved.

12 comments:

  1. How neat that pomegranate is. I am using the old blogger too. I hate the new one and refuse to use it. Why do they always have to go change things up?

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    1. Jane - And they are delicious :)

      I've heard that old Blogger is going to be withdrawn shortly, and only the new one will be available. Hope they sort out the problem soon...?

      Delete
  2. Your chard .. even though you probably have it coming out of your ears .. will truly be savored this winter pulled from the freezer. Last year I had kale coming out of our ears and just used up the last bit of it in soup. Now I miss it ;( and thought I'd never run out of it. How great to have a pomegranate tree. So little of a tree to have such ripe fruit. Enjoy :)

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    1. Mrs Mac - Loads and loads of Swiss Chard. But I'm not complaining :)

      We've actually got 7 pomegranate trees - so far...

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  3. We just planted our first pomegranate tree, Hoping for some of those lucious seeds, in a year or two I suppose. Though there is one small fruit growing on it at the moment. Hey, I'll take what we can get, ha. Nice job!!

    As for the new blogger, ugh, I hate it too. But yeah, I think it's about to be our only choice.... :-(

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    1. 1st Man - If you have a fruit growing (not just the flower) then you should harvest it by the end of your summer :) They are absolutely delicious :)

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  4. What I wouldn't do for a fresh pomegranate! They are my absolute favorite, though I'm not sure they would actually grow here! Hmmm...I guess i should google that, ha? ;-)

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    1. BG - If you have hot, dry summers there should be no problem :) Pomegranates don't like wet feet - it rots their roots. also, they can handle some drought type situations - they're not fussy :)

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  5. What a luxurious fruit to grow yourself Dani...and it looks absolutely delicious! Did you know that the pomegranate has been used symbolically to represent prosperity for thousands of years? You can find its image carved into ancient ruins, on the backs of very old coins and even painted into artwork from the Renaissance. Quite an interesting fruit!

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    1. Tanya - I didn't know that it symbolized prosperity - hopefully our first ripe fruit brings in the boodle LOL

      I have also heard that Wild Pomegranates have as many pips as there are commandments in the Old Testament - 613 in total. And, no, I've never counted them LOL Not yet...

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  6. Always have to be new and improved. Upwards and onward!!! ueah right. Downwards and backwards!!

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    1. John - Lol - in the case of Blogger - yeah - backwards! At least until they've properly ironed out the teething problems that the ne GUI obviously has.

      And they want to cease offering the old GUI within a month...?

      Delete

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