Thursday, 11 August 2011

Farm animals

RSon was away on site, and naturally we couldn't leave Scamp (a.k.a. Scallywag) alone in Cape Town whilst we went to the farm, so he came along with us.


He seemed to take the (extended) trip OK - we stopped just outside Caledon for him to have a run around and a drink of water.


As we got near the farm, he shoved his nose out of the window and began to sniff.  Oh boy!  Did Scamp ever have a rush around with nose glued to the ground when we got to the farm.  But, he didn't stray too far from RMan...


We left him alone to do his own thing / acclimatize when suddenly we noticed that he was nowhere to be seen.  A mad dash around ensued, with both of us calling his name.  Nada.  No response.


Then I found him...
We had left a car door open after unloading, and Scamp had jumped back into the car - reckon this townie dog wasn't too impressed with the farm - especially after having come face to face with a cow - which was much bigger than him.
It took us about half-an-hour to cajole him back out of the car.  And naturally, when we lit the fire for the afternoon barbecue, he settled down.


A couple of days later, he felt confident enough to wander off exploring, but only if we were in the general area of the property that he wanted to investigate.
He was happy to get home on Tuesday though...


As we were leaving the farm I spied an ewe and her lamb in the field next to our gate.  What was different about this lamb was...
...the lambs umbilical cord was still hanging down and, in fact, was still dripping.  This precious little lamb had just been born.


But, my question to RMan was: "How can this tiny little lamb make it through the nights"?


The temperature whilst we were there this time went down to 3oC (37oF).  And more snow is expected this weekend...
But, the lamb was just too precious for words...  How privileged I felt to have seen Mother Nature doing her thing...

6 comments:

  1. Poor Scamp...I know the feeling. Take me to the BIG city and I want to find my security blanket too. Sensory overload!

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  2. That is to funny!

    Nature is an amazing thing.

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  3. Mad Dog was like that too the first time. Now her tail starts wagging the moment we turn off the N2 onto the gravel road.....recognition and memory.

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  4. tami - I, too, don't like strange places, but I thought our presence would help the transition...

    Jane - Mother Nature constantly blows me away :)

    Mad Dog and Englishman - I'd love to know exactly what dogs can remember - and if they dream about what they experience in the day...?

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  5. It took a while for eldest daughter's dog, that is temporarily living with us, to acclimatise to the farm. Now she swims in the dam, runs around playing with my dog amongst cows and horses and knows that to chase hens or ducks will put her in our 'bad' books.
    She's also fitter and stronger than she's ever been.
    Cheers,
    Robyn

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  6. Stitchin' time - Yes - can imagine that Scamp could lose a few pounds if he was on the farm regularly :)

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